No-zone Truck Accidents

A driver operating vehicle as long as an 18-wheeler, which is 70 feet long and weighs around 80,000 lbs., will most likely find maneuvering it a little challenging and seeing all other vehicles on the road, impossible. This is due to an an 18-wheeler truck’s “no-zone” or blind spot areas, wherein smaller vehicles which may be driving in these (areas) become invisible or unnoticeable to truck drivers.

“No-zone” areas or blind spots refer to spots where crashes are most likely to occur because smaller vehicles are almost always never noticed by truck drivers. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), these areas include a truck’s:

  • Front, where smaller vehicle can be rear-ended or crashed by a truck if ever its driver suddenly slows down or makes an emergency stop.
  • Cars slowing down right after overtaking a truck is actually one of the things truck drivers badly hate;
  • Rear, where smaller vehicles tailgate a truck. Tailgating is not just really dangerous and a major traffic safety issue; it is also legally prohibited in all states; and,
  • Right or passenger side, where a truck driver can totally fail to notice smaller vehicles. If a truck makes a right turn, the vehicle to its right can easily be crushed.

This is issue of “no-zone” area is a real concern in 13 states (Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota and Utah) where triple trailers, also called road trains, are still allowed to operate (a road train refers to a normal tractor unit pulling two or more trailers instead of just one).

According to a West Palm Beach accident attorney, though many truck drivers and trucking companies do everything they can to stay safe on the roadway, the sad reality is that not everyone exercises this level of caution, putting unsuspecting motorists in harm’s way. There are even instances when drivers are forced to exceed the set hours of service restrictions, abuse alcohol and/or amphetamines while behind the wheel, or drivers/companies that fail to keep their trucks in good working order regularly, exposing everyone on the road to serious risks.

Getting harmed in a truck accident or, worse, losing a loved one, is nothing short of tragic. Though filing a civil lawsuit against the liable driver and/or a trucking company may involve lots of legal challenges, this is still the most sane thing to do in order to claim the compensation that the victim deserves.

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